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The wife and mother of victims of the Titanic sub-disaster reveals that she originally intended to be on a doomed ship

The mother of a {teen} who died in the Titan disaster with her multi-millionaire father had originally intended to go on the fateful trip, but gave up her seat to her son because he ‘wanted it so bad’.

Christine Dawood and her Pakistani businessman husband Shahzada Dawood had originally booked a visit to the Titanic wreck for themselves but had to cancel the trip due to the coronavirus pandemic, she told the BBC.

She said when their household booked their spots on this year’s OceanGate Expeditions mission, she “backed out” because her 19-year-old son, Suleman, “really wanted it.”

The mother-of-two revealed she was “really happy” that Shahzada and Suleman embarked on the journey together, including the teenager’s intention to solve a Rubik’s cube 3,700 meters under the ocean.

Christine and her 17-year-old daughter Alina were on board Titan’s mothership, the Polar Prince, when word came in that they had miscommunications shortly after it began sinking at 8am on Sunday, June 18.

A major search-and-rescue mission was launched that lasted several days, and while her daughter held out hope throughout, Christine said she “gave up hope when we got past the 96-hour mark.”

Christina Dawood and her Pakistani businessman husband Shahzada Dawood had originally booked a visit to the Titanic wreck for themselves, but had to cancel their trip due to the coronavirus pandemic. The couple is pictured collectively

Christine stated that when their household booked places on this year’s OceanGate Expeditions mission, she “backed out” because her 19-year-old son Suleman “really wanted it”. She and Suleman are pictured together

According to the US Coast Guard, British businessman Shahzada and his son Suleman were two of the 5 victims who died instantly when the submarine suffered a “catastrophic collapse” just 500 meters from the Titanic’s bow.

Christine revealed that she was planning to go with her husband to see the wreck of the Titanic at the OceanGate submarine, but their trip was canceled due to the Covid pandemic.

“Then I stepped back and gave them a place for (Sulemen) to go because he really wanted to go,” she said.

“I was really happy for them because they’ve both wanted to do this for a long time.”

Christine shared how she and Alina hugged and joked with Shahzad and Suleman before the pair boarded the submarine.

Suleman, a student at the University of Strathclyde, had brought his Rubik’s Cube with him on the trip, hoping to crack the world’s file for fixing the puzzle at the best depth, she revealed.

“He said, ‘I’m going to solve the Rubik’s Cube 12,000 feet under the sea on the Titanic,'” Christine recalls.

Kristine Devuda revealed that she was “really happy” that Shahzad and Suleman embarked on the journey together, including the teenager’s intention to solve Rubik’s cubes 3,700 meters below sea level.

Suleman (pictured), a student at the University of Strathclyde, had brought his Rubik’s Cube with him on the visit in the hope of cracking the world’s file, which allows him to solve the puzzle at its best depth. Christine recalled: “He said, ‘I’m going to solve the Rubik’s Cube 12,000 feet under the sea on the Titanic.’

Suleman Dawood, 19, was the youngest victim of the Titan sub-tragedy. He is pictured with his father Shahzada Dawood, Vice Chairman of Engro Corporation Limited

After losing contact with the ship, Kristine and Alina waited for information on the website where the Titan was last seen during a search and rescue mission.

“We had a lot of hope, it was the only thing that worked for us because we had hope,” she stated.

At the end of her interview with the BBC, the heartbroken mum said with tears in her eyes: “I miss her. I really miss them a lot.’

In addition to her husband and son, three other people died aboard the Titan: OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush, 61, British businessman Hamish Harding, 58, and Paul Henry Nargeol, 77, a former French Navy diver and veteran Titanic diver.

Christine said those above the water tried to stay hopeful, saying to themselves, “In this underwater sea, people could do so many things to get to the surface … they dropped the scales, then the agreement was slower. we kept looking at the surface .That hope was there.

She and her daughter initially had hope after initially failing to return.

She said: “We all thought they would just come to the surface, so the shock was delayed by about 10 hours.

“By the time they were supposed to be back, there was a time… when they resurfaced, and when that was over, there was a real shock, not shock, but worry and not so good feelings.”.

The OceanGate Titan submarine sank about 400 miles southeast of St. John’s, Newfoundland at 8 a.m. Sunday, June 18, according to the U.S. Coast Guard. It misplaced contact at 9:45 a.m., but the Coast Guard was not notified until 5:40 p.m.

Billionaire adventurer Hamish Harding, who misplaced his life aboard the Titan, is pictured searching the sea earlier than boarding a submarine.

French Navy veteran PH Nargeole (left) Stockton Rush (right), executive director of the OceanGate expedition, also misplaced his life on Titan.

Despite the grim outlook, as the hunt continued, she said her teenage daughter had no misplaced hope of saving her father and older brother.

“My daughter didn’t lose hope until the call to the Coast Guard when they told us they had found the wreck.”

Alina’s mum said: “She is such an amazing young lady, she is so conscientious.”

“She believes in science, and she really believes, like when you get on an airplane, that science and mechanics and engineering will work.”

Christine, aged 96, said she “tried very hard” to prevent her daughter from seeing that she had given up hope.

The household returned to St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada, on Saturday after word spread that the wreckage of the submarine had been discovered on Thursday.

On Sunday, they held a funeral prayer for Shahzada and Suleman, which Christine says has “helped”.

She paid tribute to her son, admitting that he had been a “mama’s boy” but he also “loved his father”.

When asked what the housemates’ last words to each other were, she instructed the BBC: “We just hugged and joked because Shahzada was so excited to come down, he was like a little kid.

“He had the powers of youth, they were both so excited.”

Kristine and Shahzada met at school, she pointed out when she didn’t speak English.

She recalled that the historical past buff knew more about the historical past of her native Germany than she did and was fascinated by documentaries.

“He made us all watch David Attenborough and the kids loved it.

“His enthusiasm brought out the best in me and that’s how I really learned to love history. He was really able to inspire and motivate others with his knowledge.

She said her son was practical and intellectual and never went anywhere without a Rubik’s Cube, which he learned to solve in just 12 seconds.

“Suleman made the Lego Titanic out of 10,000 pieces. He applied for the world record because he wanted to solve the Rubik’s cube at the deepest point.

Five dead on board Titan submarine after ‘catastrophic explosion’ 400 meters from Titanic’s bow

Although his application was rejected, they still planned to film the attempt, and Suleman said, “I’m going to solve the Rubik’s Cube 12,000 feet under the sea on the Titanic.”

Ms. Dawood said she and her daughter are determined to try to finish the Rubik’s Cube in Suleman’s honor and that she plans to continue her husband’s work.

She said: “He was involved in so many things, he helped so many people, and I think Alina and I really want to carry on that legacy and give him that platform as his work goes on, and that’s important to my daughter as well.

“Alina and I announced that we would learn how to fix Rubik’s cubes. This is likely to be a problem for us because we are very dangerous, even though we will be taught that.

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