News

Rare tropical seabird Brown Booby not usually found in US spotted hunting in Indiana

An uncommon tropical seabird, not usually found in the US, has taken up residence in the hills of southern Indiana.

A juvenile Sula leucogaster, a species generally referred to as a brown booby, was spotted Monday diving into the lake at Spring Mill State Park in Mitchell to catch fish by the park’s interpretive naturalist, Wade LaHue. 

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources mentioned as a result of the fowl is a juvenile, he has totally different colorations than an grownup fowl.

“This species is not normally found in the United States, let alone Indiana,” mentioned assistant state ornithologist Amy Kearns, noting that the fowl had wandered naturally out of its regular vary.

The current brown booby sighting marks solely the second time in the state.

The preliminary documented sighting came about on a non-public lake in Zionsville in May 2019, and the fowl remained for lower than a day.

Wildlife officers mentioned the present fowl has been staying near the Lakeview Activity Center on the park, the place it has been fishing and resting on fallen timber and the newly constructed floating dock.

A juvenile Sula leucogaster, a species commonly known as a brown booby, was spotted Monday diving into the lake at Spring Mill State Park in southern Indiana.
A juvenile Sula leucogaster, a species generally referred to as a brown booby, was spotted Monday diving into the lake at Spring Mill State Park in southern Indiana. Indiana Department of Natural Resources
The Indiana Department of Natural Resources said because the bird is a juvenile, he has different colorations than an adult bird.
The Indiana Department of Natural Resources mentioned the juvenile fowl has totally different colorations than an grownup fowl. Indiana Department of Natural Resources
A brown booby flies through the air in Brazil.
A brown booby flies by means of the air in Brazil. AGB Photo Library/Universal Imag

Park workers have requested that guests give the particular fowl ample area to relaxation and feed, guaranteeing its well-being and eventual return to its ocean house.

“It could leave at any time,” Kearns mentioned.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button