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NJ state trooper with giant Hitler-related neck tattoo fired following probe into white supremacist ties

A New Jersey state trooper with a giant neck tattoo citing a well known Hitler Youth slogan was fired by the division final yr following an investigation into the ink and his different white supremacist-linked tattoos.

Trooper Jason Dare was let go from the division on Nov. 27 after almost 20 years on the job, in accordance with a newly revealed annual state police disciplinary report and an NJ.com report.

Dare’s stunning physique artwork was solely flagged by the division after New Jersey State Police put out a public lacking individuals alert for the trooper in March 2023 after he left a Pennsylvania medical facility and disappeared.

New Jersey State Trooper Jason Dare was let go from the department following an investigation into his giant neck tattoo citing a well-known Hitler Youth slogan.
New Jersey State Trooper Jason Dare was let go from the division following an investigation into his giant neck tattoo citing a well known Hitler Youth slogan. New Jersey State Police

The detective, who was described as “missing and endangered” within the alert, was discovered secure days later.

Yet it wasn’t his disappearance that was seen by the general public — however the large “Blood Honor” textual content written throughout the underside of his neck, which was seen in a photograph the division shared with his lacking individuals report.

“Blood and honor” was the motto adopted by the Hitler Youth throughout World War II as famous by social media customers who commented on the state police’s publish hoping to search out Dare.

Internet sleuths later discovered images on Dare’s Facebook web page that exposed he had extra troublesome ink, together with iron crosses on his wrists and a pit bull illustration matching the brand of the Pennsylvania-based white supremacist group, the Keystone State Skinheads, according to the anti-Defamation League.

He had additionally shared posts on Facebook alluding to white supremacist and neo-Nazi teams.

"Blood and honor" was the motto adopted by the Hitler Youth during World War II as noted by social media users who commented on the state police's post hoping to find Dare.
“Blood and honor” was the motto adopted by the Hitler Youth throughout World War II as famous by social media customers who commented on the state police’s publish hoping to search out Dare. New Jersey State Police

The New Jersey Attorney General’s Office of Public Integrity and Accountability launched an inside investigation into Dare following the complaints about his tattoos.

The probe discovered that he violated regulation enforcement insurance policies on conflicts of curiosity by means of his “visible tattoos associated with groups espousing racist ideology,” in accordance with NJ.com.

The annual personnel disciplinary report revealed by state police doesn’t record Dare’s hate-linked ink as the rationale for his termination, although his costs embody “uniform and grooming standards.”

“[Dare] violated the terms of a previously negotiated plea agreement for misconduct by leaving a medical facility without making proper notification to the Division and entering an unoccupied residence in Pennsylvania without permission,” the report states.

“The member also discharged one round from a shotgun through the front window of his residence. The member was terminated from employment with the Division.”

Dare's shocking body art was only flagged by the department after New Jersey State Police put out a public missing persons alert for the trooper in March 2023.
Dare’s stunning physique artwork was solely flagged by the division after New Jersey State Police put out a public lacking individuals alert for the trooper in March 2023. New Jersey State Police

State police haven’t disclosed any info on the circumstances of Dare’s medical therapy and disappearance or the firearm incident.

The lawyer basic’s Office informed the native outlet that Dare was let go on Nov. 27 following its investigation.

A spokesperson for the workplace didn’t instantly reply to a request for info from The Post.

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