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Longest snake species in the US released in Florida preserve

Dozens of snakes have been returned to their native Florida habitat in an effort to carry again the space’s pure stability.

A complete of 41 eastern indigo snakes, the longest snake species in the US, have been returned to nature by researchers at the eighth annual Eastern indigo snake launch.

The reptiles have been deposited at the Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve in Bristol, Florida, play “a vital role in the circle of life here,” James Bogan Jr., the director of Central Florida Zoo’s Orianne Center for Indigo Conservation, told the Miami Herald.

An eastern indigo snake shown wrapped around a handler's fingers.
A gaggle of 41 jap indigo snakes have been returned to nature in Florida. Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens
The snakes are the longest species found in the US.
The snakes are the longest species discovered in the US. Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens
The snakes were let loose at Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve in Bristol, Florida.
The snakes have been let free at Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve in Bristol, Florida. Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens

Eastern indigo snakes, that are native to the southeast US, eat venomous and nonvenomous snakes, in addition to different wildlife.

The predators assist to stability the ecosystem.

The snakes measure 5 to 7 toes in size, however some are identified to succeed in over 8 toes.

The two-year-old snakes have been all bred by the Orianne Center, the solely captive breeding facility for the species.  

A zoo worker at the preserve with an eastern indigo snake in his hands.
The species balances out the ecosystem. Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens
Three people walk through the grasses of the preserve holding eastern indigo snakes in cloth bags.
In complete, 167 snakes have been released at the Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve over the years. Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens
Eastern indigo snakes can reach lengths of over eight feet.
Eastern indigo snakes can attain lengths of over eight toes. Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens
Eastern indigo snakes eat venomous and nonvenomous snakes as well as other wildlife.
Eastern indigo snakes eat venomous and nonvenomous snakes in addition to different wildlife. Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens

The April 30 occasion marked the largest launch of the species in one 12 months, the zoo said.

In complete, 167 snakes have been released at the preserve since the effort started.

“It is wonderful to see these young indigos have the opportunity to fill their important role as a lynchpin species in the longleaf pine ecosystem,” Bogan stated.

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